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Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power

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  • Author(s): Lieven, Anatol
  • Publication Information:
    New Haven : Yale University Press. 1998
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LIEVEN, A. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998. ISBN 9780300078817. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 10 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Lieven A. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. Yale University Press; 1998. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428
    • APA:
      Lieven, A. (1998). Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. Yale University Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Lieven, Anatol. 1998. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. New Haven: Yale University Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Lieven, A. (1998) Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. New Haven: Yale University Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 10 August 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Lieven, A 1998, Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power, Yale University Press, New Haven, viewed 10 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Lieven, Anatol. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. Yale University Press, 1998. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Lieven, Anatol. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Lieven A. Chechnya : Tombstone of Russian Power [Internet]. New Haven: Yale University Press; 1998 [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=53095&custid=s8280428

Reviews

PW Reviews 1998 April #4

Journalist Lieven (The Baltic Revolution) offers something of a three-course menu in his latest book. The first is a commanding eyewitness account of the recent Chechen war and the personalities and power maneuvers surrounding it, followed by his analysis of the breakdown of the Russian military and, indeed, of the entire Russian political structure after the Soviet Union's collapse. Third is a condensed history of the Chechen (and North Caucasus) region its people, culture and attitudes, concluding with the author's prognoses. As his subtitle might suggest, Lieven's emphasis is on issues of Russian power Chechnya's strategic and symbolic significance, the breakdown of legitimacy, mismanagement and pervasive corruption within the Russian state, from Yeltsin down, which destroyed public and military morale. Russian troops who survived by theft while fighting a guerrilla war they had no training for ended up asking why they were fighting outside Russia, risking death without pay, only to inflate remote political egos and fortunes. Lieven shows enormous respect for the Chechens, whose memory of Stalin's mass deportations between 1944 and 1958 galvanized their resolve to be free. Although helpful to understanding Russia and Chechnya today and rich in firsthand information, the work's three main themes remain unsatisfactorily integrated, while Lieven's indictment of post-Soviet Russia begs for a larger work, with Chechnya as one telling chapter. (May) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

PW Reviews 1998 April #3

Journalist Lieven (The Baltic Revolution) offers something of a three-course menu in his latest book. The first is a commanding eyewitness account of the recent Chechen war and the personalities and power maneuvers surrounding it, followed by his analysis of the breakdown of the Russian military and, indeed, of the entire Russian political structure after the Soviet Union's collapse. Third is a condensed history of the Chechen (and North Caucasus) region?its people, culture and attitudes, concluding with the author's prognoses. As his subtitle might suggest, Lieven's emphasis is on issues of Russian power?Chechnya's strategic and symbolic significance, the breakdown of legitimacy, mismanagement and pervasive corruption within the Russian state, from Yeltsin down, which destroyed public and military morale. Russian troops who survived by theft while fighting a guerrilla war they had no training for ended up asking why they were fighting outside Russia, risking death without pay, only to inflate remote political egos and fortunes. Lieven shows enormous respect for the Chechens, whose memory of Stalin's mass deportations between 1944 and 1958 galvanized their resolve to be free. Although helpful to understanding Russia and Chechnya today and rich in firsthand information, the work's three main themes remain unsatisfactorily integrated, while Lieven's indictment of post-Soviet Russia begs for a larger work, with Chechnya as one telling chapter. (May)