Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Author(s): G. A. Bradshaw
  • Publication Information:
    New Haven : Yale University Press. 2009
  • معلومة اضافية
    • Publication Type:
      eBook.
    • Abstract:
      “At times sad and at times heartwarming... Helps us to understand not only elephants, but all animals, including ourselves” (Peter Singer, author of Animal Liberation). Drawing on accounts from India to Africa and California to Tennessee, and on research in neuroscience, psychology, and animal behavior, G. A. Bradshaw explores the minds, emotions, and lives of elephants. Wars, starvation, mass culls, poaching, and habitat loss have reduced elephant numbers from more than ten million to a few hundred thousand, leaving orphans bereft of the elders who would normally mentor them. As a consequence, traumatized elephants have become aggressive against people, other animals, and even one another; their behavior is comparable to that of humans who have experienced genocide, other types of violence, and social collapse. By exploring the elephant mind and experience in the wild and in captivity, Bradshaw bears witness to the breakdown of ancient elephant cultures. But, she reminds us, all is not lost. People are working to save elephants by rescuing orphaned infants and rehabilitating adult zoo and circus elephants, using the same principles psychologists apply in treating humans who have survived trauma. Bradshaw urges us to support these and other models of elephant recovery and to solve pressing social and environmental crises affecting all animals—humans included. “This book opens the door into the soul of the elephant. It will really make you think about our relationship with other animals.” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals in Translation
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Related ISBNs:
      9780300127317. 9780300154917.
    • Accession Number:
      586143223
    • Accession Number:
      302213
    • Publication Information:
      Print/Save 0 pages
      Copy/Paste Restricted
      Download Restricted
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      G. A. BRADSHAW. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009. ISBN 9780300127317. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 13 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      G. A. Bradshaw. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. Yale University Press; 2009. Accessed August 13, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428
    • APA:
      G. A. Bradshaw. (2009). Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. Yale University Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      G. A. Bradshaw. 2009. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. New Haven: Yale University Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      G. A. Bradshaw (2009) Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. New Haven: Yale University Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 13 August 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      G. A. Bradshaw 2009, Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity, Yale University Press, New Haven, viewed 13 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      G. A. Bradshaw. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. Yale University Press, 2009. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      G. A. Bradshaw. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      G. A. Bradshaw. Elephants on the Edge : What Animals Teach Us About Humanity [Internet]. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2009 [cited 2020 Aug 13]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=302213&custid=s8280428

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2009 October #2

This volume by an animal trauma specialist and director of the Kerulos Center (www.kerulos.org), an animal welfare organization, mixes science and poetry in urging us to rethink our attitudes toward elephant suffering. In the first half, Bradshaw draws on the latest research in neuroscience, psychology, and animal behavior to present an excellent portrait of elephant psychology and personality, revealing how elephant trauma is very similar to the human experience. But she undercuts her argument in the second half with a polemical attack on all institutional human contact with elephants: zoos, circuses, theme parks, and ecotourist preserves. She carefully details worst-case abuses, comparing the system to the Nazi annihilation of Jews and the U.S. destruction of American Indians. The key question is: Does Bradshaw's proof of elephant sentience and "personhood" force us to the conclusion of total animal-human separation? Her ideal model is the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, where visitors are prohibited, and elephants roam freely with very little human contact. VERDICT While Bradshaw offers perceptive and solid science, she unfortunately draws some dubious practical conclusions.—John M. Kistler, Washington, PA

[Page 97]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

PW Reviews 2009 August #3

This thoughtful book by animal trauma specialist Bradshaw draws analogies between human and animal culture to illustrate the profound "breakdown" occurring in elephant societies. Extraordinarily sensitive and social, elephants' survival has long depended on their matriarchal lineage—now sundered by culling the herds, which disrupts the hierarchy—and their psyches have been broken by prolonged isolation and separation, painful hooks used as training tools and general cruelty. Captured elephants meet the criteria of the psychiatirc handbook DSM for suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Drawing on research on animal trauma, concentration camp survivors and Konrad Lorenz–type ethology, Bradshaw makes a multidisciplinary condemnation of elephant abuse and celebrates those working on rehabilitating and healing the animals—including an elephant massage therapist and the owners of an elephant sanctuary in the Tennessee hills. In the end, anthropomorphizing isn't the issue; Bradshaw says that instead of giving animals human feelings, we should observe that they have feelings that correlate with what we may feel in similar circumstances. With its heartbreaking findings and irrefutable conclusions, this book bears careful reading and consideration. (Oct.)

[Page 57]. Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.