The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Publication Type:
      eBook.
    • Abstract:
      'Makes you feel as if you're part of an engaging dinnertime conversation.'—Science News Krill—it's a familiar word that conjures oceans, whales, and swimming crustaceans. Scientists say they are one of most abundant animals on the planet. But when pressed, few people can accurately describe krill or explain their ecological importance. Antarctic krill have used their extraordinary adaptive skills to survive and thrive for millions of years in a dark, icy world far from human interference. But with climate change melting ice caps at the top and bottom of the world, and increased human activity and pollution, their evolutionary flexibility to withstand these new pressures may not be enough. Eminent krill scientist Stephen Nicol wants us to know more about this enigmatic creature of the sea. He argues that it's critical to understand krill's complex biology in order to protect them as the krill fishing industry expands. This account of Antarctic krill-one of the largest of eighty-five krill species-takes us to the Southern Ocean to learn firsthand the difficulties and rewards of studying krill in its habitat. Nicol lays to rest the notion that krill are simply microscopic, shrimplike whale food but are in fact midway up the food chain, consumers of phytoplankton and themselves consumed by whales, seals, and penguins. From his early education about the sex lives of krill in the Bay of Fundy to a krill tattoo gone awry, Nicol uses humor and personal stories to bring the biology and beauty of krill alive. In the final chapters, he examines the possibility of an increasingly ice-free Southern Ocean and what that means for the fate of krill-and us. Ocean enthusiasts will come away with a newfound appreciation for the complex ecology of a species we have much to learn from, and many reasons to protect.
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Related ISBNs:
      9781610918534. 9781610918541.
    • Accession Number:
      1039420567
    • Accession Number:
      2156428
    • Publication Information:
      Print/Save 100 pages
      Copy/Paste Allowed
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      NICOL, S.; MANGEL, M. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Washington, DC: Island Press, 2018. ISBN 9781610918534. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 16 fev. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Nicol S, Mangel M. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Washington, DC: Island Press; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428. Accessed February 16, 2020.
    • APA:
      Nicol, S., & Mangel, M. (2018). The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Island Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Nicol, Stephen, and Marc Mangel. 2018. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Washington, DC: Island Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Nicol, S. and Mangel, M. (2018) The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Washington, DC: Island Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 16 February 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Nicol, S & Mangel, M 2018, The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World, Island Press, Washington, DC, viewed 16 February 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Nicol, Stephen, and Marc Mangel. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Island Press, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Nicol, Stephen, and Marc Mangel. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World. Washington, DC: Island Press, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Nicol S, Mangel M. The Curious Life of Krill : A Conservation Story From the Bottom of the World [Internet]. Washington, DC: Island Press; 2018 [cited 2020 Feb 16]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=2156428&custid=s8280428

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2018 April #1

When most people consider krill, their initial thought is probably "whale food." Nicol (marine and Antarctic studies, Univ. of Tasmania) entertainingly demonstrates that these misunderstood crustaceans serve far more purpose than simply feeding cetaceans (and seals and penguins). Antarctic krill form the core of the ecosystem in the Southern Ocean and are one of the most abundant animal species on the planet. Contrary to popular belief, they are not microscopic; their average length is six centimeters or over two inches. These crustaceans, which live in enormous swarms, can have long lifespans and complicated life cycles. Antarctic krill are extremely difficult to study, owing to the inhospitable waters in which they live and the ice that covers their habitat each winter. Nicol describes the history of krill research and the difficulties encountered in observing, collecting, and studying the species. He also discusses the krill fishing industry and krill's potential as a human food source. VERDICT As the Antarctic ecosystem warms, it becomes ever more important that we understand the biology of krill and how their adaptation to climate change will impact the other varied species that feed on them. Of interest to marine scientists and anyone concerned for the future of our oceans.—Rachel Owens, Daytona State Coll. Lib., FL

Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2018 March #2

Marine scientist Nicol's passion for krill—the ocean-dwelling crustaceans that serve as the primary food source for baleen whales, and his subject of study for almost 40 years—certainly comes across in this accessible volume. The shrimplike creatures, which most laypeople mistakenly believe to be microscopic in size, spend their entire lives swimming, unlike many other crustaceans, and are an essential part of the ocean's food chain. The substantive results of Nicol's scientific work, which includes new discoveries about the presence of krill below the ocean's upper levels, aren't the main focus; Nicol wants to appeal to the nonspecialist and in so doing conveys facts that will probably be new to many lay readers—including that krill are "possibly the most abundant animal on the planet" and that, mysteriously, their genome is 12 times larger than the human genome—and discusses efforts to market krill as food for people. He also studs the narrative with frequent references to the animated film Happy Feet 2, which has krill characters. Readers looking for a sophisticated scientific discussion may want to swim on by, but those seeking a very accessible entry point to marine biology and conservation will find it here. (May)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.