I Can't Talk About the Trees Without the Blood

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  • Author(s): Clark, Tiana
  • Series:
    Pitt Poetry Series
  • Publication Information:
    Pittsburgh, Pa : University of Pittsburgh Press. 2018
  • معلومة اضافية
    • Publication Type:
      eBook.
    • Abstract:
      Winner of the 2017 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize For prize-winning poet Tiana Clark, trees will never be just trees. They will also and always be a row of gallows from which Black bodies once swung. This is an image that she cannot escape, but one that she has learned to lean into as she delves into personal and public histories, explicating memories and muses around race, elegy, family, and faith by making and breaking forms as well as probing mythology, literary history, her own ancestry, and, yes, even Rihanna. I Can't Talk About the Trees without the Blood, because Tiana cannot engage with the physical and psychic landscape of the South without seeing the braided trauma of the broken past—she will always see blood on the leaves.
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Related ISBNs:
      9780822965589. 9780822986164.
    • Accession Number:
      1061503257
    • Accession Number:
      1917727
    • Publication Information:
      Print/Save 100 pages
      Copy/Paste Allowed
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CLARK, T. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018. ISBN 9780822965589. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 18 fev. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Clark T. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428. Accessed February 18, 2020.
    • APA:
      Clark, T. (2018). I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Clark, Tiana. 2018. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. Pitt Poetry Series. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Clark, T. (2018) I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press (Pitt Poetry Series). Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 18 February 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Clark, T 2018, I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood, Pitt Poetry Series, University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pa, viewed 18 February 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Clark, Tiana. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Clark, Tiana. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood. Pitt Poetry Series. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Clark T. I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood [Internet]. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press; 2018 [cited 2020 Feb 18]. (Pitt Poetry Series). Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=1917727&custid=s8280428

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2018 September #2

*Starred Review* In this blistering, multivalent debut poetry collection, Clark delivers a relentlessly creative examination of black experiences, especially as lived by folks in the South, where the author attended graduate school, and where the myth of a post-racial America thrives due to the antebellum base, the bedrock of Southern amnesia. Employing an abundantly wide range of poetic forms, Clark combines pithy lines, running sentences, odd indentations, and intentional use of white space, often within the same poem. Her speakers describe keloids ("Cain-cursed with magical crust, armored melatonin"), and the skin of the only survivor of the Mount Pelée eruption ("a blistered onyx back, cracked coal, black tephra"), and Clark confronts discomfort with brutal honesty. Of her white husband, a speaker admits: "I'm attracted to things / that once owned me." Elsewhere, unexpected combinations generate beautiful imagery: "the forgotten phonics of blood," "the bluing drag of dawn," "a cluster of fluffy chromosomes." The list goes on. It's in this boundless imagination and versatility that Clark earns a place among the pantheon of such emerging black poets as Eve Ewing, Nicole Sealey, and Airea D. Matthews. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2018 September #2

"For me, trees will never be just trees. They will also and always be a row of gallows from which Black bodies once swung." Thus does Clark explain the title of her Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize winner, which viscerally imparts the trauma visited on the African American body—and therefore the African American soul. "I carry so many black souls/ in my skin," she says in one poem prompted by her white mother-in-law's wish for the family to be photographed at Carnton Plantation. The plea, "Can't we just let/ the past by the past?" is resoundingly answered throughout in the negative. In the unsettling and ambitious "Cottonmouth," the snake's gaping mouth evokes both being swallowed and the dilating vagina, with the speaker finally "[giving] birth to myself." Yet the struggle to claim herself against physical and psychic violence continues, as she hears the incessant echo of racial epithet and, in the affecting "Tim," identifies with a terrified baby goat. VERDICT An honest, punch-angry portrait of being American while black.

Copyright 2018 Library Journal.