Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Affiliation:
      a Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
      b University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
      c Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
      d Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
      e School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
      f Department of Family Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
      g Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China
      h Division of Cardiology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China
      i Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
      j Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Case Western Reserve Medical School, Cleveland, Ohio
    • Abstract:
      Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution and environmental temperatures influence cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that several air pollutants can promote dyslipidemia; however, the impact of ambient PM2.5 and temperature on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function remains unclear. We hypothesized that daily exposures to higher levels of ambient PM2.5 and colder outdoor temperatures would impair HDL functionality. Lipoproteins, serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), and HDL oxidation markers were measured twice in 50 healthy adults (age 32.1 ± 9.6 years) living in southeast Michigan and associated with ambient and personal-level exposures using mixed models. Although previous 7-day mean outdoor temperature (4.4 ± 9.8°C) and PM2.5 levels (9.1 ± 1.8 µg/m3) were low, higher ambient PM2.5 exposures (per 10 µg/m3) were associated with significant increases in the total cholesterol-to-HDL-C ratio (rolling average lag days 1 and 2) as well as reductions in CEC by −1.93% (lag day 5, p = 0.022) and −1.62% (lag day 6, p = 0.032). Colder outdoor temperatures (per 10°C) were also associated with decreases in CEC from −0.62 to −0.63% (rolling average lag days 5 and 7, p = 0.027 and 0.028). Previous 24-hour personal-level PM2.5 and temperature exposures did not impact outcomes, nor were any exposures associated with changes in HDL-oxidation metrics. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that ambient PM2.5 (even at low levels) and outdoor temperatures may influence serum CEC, a critical antiatherosclerotic HDL function.
    • ISSN:
      0002-9149
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061
    • Accession Number:
      S0002914918310622
    • Copyright:
      © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MATHEW, A. V. et al. Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function. The American Journal of Cardiology, [s. l.], v. 122, n. 4, p. 565–570, 2018. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 13 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Mathew AV, Yu J, Guo Y, et al. Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function. The American Journal of Cardiology. 2018;122(4):565-570. doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061.
    • APA:
      Mathew, A. V., Yu, J., Guo, Y., Byun, J., Chen, Y. E., Wang, L., … Brook, R. D. (2018). Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function. The American Journal of Cardiology, 122(4), 565–570. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Mathew, Anna Vachaparampil, Joyce Yu, Yanhong Guo, Jaeman Byun, Y. Eugene Chen, Lu Wang, Mochuan Liu, et al. 2018. “Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function.” The American Journal of Cardiology 122 (4): 565–70. doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061.
    • Harvard:
      Mathew, A. V. et al. (2018) ‘Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function’, The American Journal of Cardiology, 122(4), pp. 565–570. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Mathew, AV, Yu, J, Guo, Y, Byun, J, Chen, YE, Wang, L, Liu, M, Bard, RL, Morishita, M, Huang, W, Li, J, Harkema, JR, Rajagopalan, S, Pennathur, S & Brook, RD 2018, ‘Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function’, The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 122, no. 4, pp. 565–570, viewed 13 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Mathew, Anna Vachaparampil, et al. “Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function.” The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 122, no. 4, Aug. 2018, pp. 565–570. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Mathew, Anna Vachaparampil, Joyce Yu, Yanhong Guo, Jaeman Byun, Y. Eugene Chen, Lu Wang, Mochuan Liu, et al. “Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function.” The American Journal of Cardiology 122, no. 4 (August 15, 2018): 565–70. doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.061.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Mathew AV, Yu J, Guo Y, Byun J, Chen YE, Wang L, et al. Effect of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Colder Outdoor Temperatures on High-Density Lipoprotein Function. The American Journal of Cardiology [Internet]. 2018 Aug 15 [cited 2019 Nov 13];122(4):565–70. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0002914918310622&custid=s8280428