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What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics.

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      713940 Fitness and Recreational Sports Centers
    • Abstract:
      Background: Running participation continues to increase. The ideal strike pattern during running is a controversial topic. Many coaches and therapists promote non-rearfoot strike (NRFS) running with a belief that it can treat and prevent injury, and improve running economy. Objective: The aims of this review were to synthesise the evidence comparing NRFS with rearfoot strike (RFS) running patterns in relation to injury and running economy (primary aim), and biomechanics (secondary aim). Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Consideration was given to within participant, between participant, retrospective, and prospective study designs. Data Sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus. Results: Fifty-three studies were included. Limited evidence indicated that NRFS running is retrospectively associated with lower reported rates of mild (standard mean difference (SMD), 95% CI 3.25, 2.37–4.12), moderate (3.65, 2.71–4.59) and severe (0.93, 0.32–1.55) repetitive stress injury. Studies prospectively comparing injury risk between strike patterns are lacking. Limited evidence indicated that running economy did not differ between habitual RFS and habitual NRFS runners at slow (10.8–11.0 km/h), moderate (12.6–13.5 km/h), and fast (14.0–15.0 km/h) speeds, and was reduced in the immediate term when an NRFS-running pattern was imposed on habitual RFS runners at slow (10.8 km/h; SMD = − 1.67, − 2.82 to − 0.52) and moderate (12.6 km/h; − 1.26, − 2.42 to − 0.10) speeds. Key biomechanical findings, consistently including both comparison between habitual strike patterns and following immediate transition from RFS to NRFS running, indicated that NRFS running was associated with lower average and peak vertical loading rate (limited-moderate evidence; SMDs = 0.72–2.15); lower knee flexion range of motion (moderate-strong evidence; SMDs = 0.76–0.88); reduced patellofemoral joint stress (limited evidence; SMDs = 0.63–0.68); and greater peak internal ankle plantar flexor moment (limited evidence; SMDs = 0.73–1.33). Conclusion: The relationship between strike pattern and injury risk could not be determined, as current evidence is limited to retrospective findings. Considering the lack of evidence to support any improvements in running economy, combined with the associated shift in loading profile (i.e., greater ankle and plantarflexor loading) found in this review, changing strike pattern cannot be recommended for an uninjured RFS runner. PROSPERO Registration: CRD42015024523. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Sports Medicine is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1The Injury Clinic Physiotherapy, 100 Fyans Street, 3220, South Geelong, VIC, Australia
      2La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, 3086, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
      3Discipline of Podiatry, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, 3086, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
      4School of Physical Therapy and Bone and Joint Institute, The University of Western Ontario, N6A 3K7, London, ON, Canada
      5Department of Surgery, St Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    • Full Text Word Count:
      16348
    • ISSN:
      0112-1642
    • Accession Number:
      10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y
    • Accession Number:
      142631743
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ANDERSON, L. M. et al. What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics. Sports Medicine, [s. l.], v. 50, n. 5, p. 885–917, 2020. DOI 10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142631743&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 15 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Anderson LM, Bonanno DR, Hart HF, Barton CJ. What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics. Sports Medicine. 2020;50(5):885-917. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y.
    • AMA11:
      Anderson LM, Bonanno DR, Hart HF, Barton CJ. What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics. Sports Medicine. 2020;50(5):885-917. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y
    • APA:
      Anderson, L. M., Bonanno, D. R., Hart, H. F., & Barton, C. J. (2020). What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics. Sports Medicine, 50(5), 885–917. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Anderson, Laura M., Daniel R. Bonanno, Harvi F. Hart, and Christian J. Barton. 2020. “What Are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics.” Sports Medicine 50 (5): 885–917. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y.
    • Harvard:
      Anderson, L. M. et al. (2020) ‘What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics’, Sports Medicine, 50(5), pp. 885–917. doi: 10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Anderson, LM, Bonanno, DR, Hart, HF & Barton, CJ 2020, ‘What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics’, Sports Medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 885–917, viewed 15 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Anderson, Laura M., et al. “What Are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics.” Sports Medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 885–917. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Anderson, Laura M., Daniel R. Bonanno, Harvi F. Hart, and Christian J. Barton. “What Are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics.” Sports Medicine 50, no. 5 (May 2020): 885–917. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Anderson LM, Bonanno DR, Hart HF, Barton CJ. What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics. Sports Medicine [Internet]. 2020 May [cited 2020 Jul 15];50(5):885–917. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142631743&custid=s8280428