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Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue.

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      physical performance
      quadriceps
      rehabilitative
      sport
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      541910 Marketing Research and Public Opinion Polling
    • Abstract:
      Studies determining the effect of music on physical performance have primarily focused on outcomes such as running time to exhaustion, blood lactate, or maximal oxygen uptake. The electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMGFT) is determined through a single incremental test and operationally defined as the highest exercise intensity that can be sustained indefinitely without an increase in EMG activity of the working muscle. To date, no studies have examined the role of fast-tempo music on EMGFT. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to determine whether fast-tempo music attenuates neuromuscular fatigue as measured by the EMGFT. We hypothesized that listening to fast-tempo music during exercise would increase the estimated EMGFT compared with the control condition. Secondarily, we hypothesized that maximal power output would also increase as a result of listening to fast-tempo music during the exercise workbout. Ten healthy college-aged men (mean ± SEM: age, 25.3 ± 0.8 years [range from 22 to 31 years]; body mass, 78.3 ± 1.8 kg; height: 1.77 ± 0.02 m) visited the laboratory on 2 occasions separated by 7 days. The EMGFT was determined from an incremental single-leg knee-extensor ergometer for each visit. In a randomized order, subjects either listened to music or no music for the 2 visits. All music was presented as instrumentals and randomized with a tempo ranging between 137 and 160 b⋅min-1. The results indicated that listening to fast-tempo music during exercise increased maximal power output (No Music: 48 ± 4; Music: 54 ± 3 W; p = 0.02) and EMGFT (No Music: 27 ± 3; Music: 34 ± 4 W; p = 0.008). There were, however, no significant mean differences between the 2 conditions (no music vs. music) for absolute and relative end-exercise heart rate as well as end-exercise rating of perceived exertion for the exercised leg. These findings suggest that listening to fast-tempo music increased overall exercise tolerance as well as the neuromuscular fatigue threshold. The results are applicable to both sport and rehabilitative settings. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Physical Therapy Program, Department of Health Care Sciences, Wayne State University, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan
      2Integrative Physiology of Exercise Laboratory, Department of Health Care Sciences, Wayne State University, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan
    • ISSN:
      1064-8011
    • Accession Number:
      142221633
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CENTALA, J. et al. Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), [s. l.], v. 34, n. 3, p. 617–622, 2020. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 10 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Centala J, Pogorel C, Pummill SW, Malek MH. Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). 2020;34(3):617-622. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428. Accessed July 10, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Centala J, Pogorel C, Pummill SW, Malek MH. Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). 2020;34(3):617-622. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428
    • APA:
      Centala, J., Pogorel, C., Pummill, S. W., & Malek, M. H. (2020). Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), 34(3), 617–622.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Centala, Jacob, Cameron Pogorel, Scott W. Pummill, and Moh H. Malek. 2020. “Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue.” Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) 34 (3): 617–22. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Centala, J. et al. (2020) ‘Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue’, Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), 34(3), pp. 617–622. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 10 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Centala, J, Pogorel, C, Pummill, SW & Malek, MH 2020, ‘Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue’, Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 617–622, viewed 10 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Centala, Jacob, et al. “Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue.” Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), vol. 34, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 617–622. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Centala, Jacob, Cameron Pogorel, Scott W. Pummill, and Moh H. Malek. “Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue.” Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) 34, no. 3 (March 2020): 617–22. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Centala J, Pogorel C, Pummill SW, Malek MH. Listening to Fast-Tempo Music Delays the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) [Internet]. 2020 Mar [cited 2020 Jul 10];34(3):617–22. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=142221633&custid=s8280428