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The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens.

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      baitworms
      ghost shrimp
      invasion vector
      invasive
      propagule pressure
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      114114 Freshwater fishing
      311710 Seafood Product Preparation and Packaging
      451110 Sporting Goods Stores
      451119 All other sporting goods stores
    • Abstract:
      Importation of marine live bait may be an important pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species (NIS), but little is known about the diversity of species or the numbers of individuals imported via this pathway. In 2009, we investigated the marine live bait trade in California as a potential introduction pathway for NIS. We estimated that in that year, ~ 1,900,000 ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis), ~ 575,000 bloodworms (Glycera dibranchiata), ~ 600,000 pileworms (Alitta virens), and ~ 1,100,000 lugworms (Perinereis sp.) were imported into California from different parts of the world. Along with the target imported species, hitchhiker species were commonly observed in live bait shipments. We exposed two of the live bait species (G. dibranchiata and Perinereis sp.) to a range of temperature conditions (12, 16, and 24 °C) found in nearshore marine habitats of southern California, and found that their short-term survival was not restricted at the two cooler temperature conditions, but that survival of Perinereis sp. was significantly reduced at the highest temperature, 24 °C. Though relatively few bait species were imported into the state in 2009, the large number of individuals imported and their high survival in thermal conditions typical of southern California habitats suggests that the live bait trade may be an important potential pathway for the introduction of NIS to this region. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840, USA
      2Current affiliations: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, 612 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
      3Department of Biological Sciences, Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite Parkway, Mission Viejo, CA 92692, USA
    • ISSN:
      1989-8649
    • Accession Number:
      10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05
    • Accession Number:
      135883199
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      PASSARELLI, B.; PERNET, B. The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens. Management of Biological Invasions, [s. l.], v. 10, n. 1, p. 80–95, 2019. DOI 10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=135883199&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 15 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Passarelli B, Pernet B. The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens. Management of Biological Invasions. 2019;10(1):80-95. doi:10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05.
    • AMA11:
      Passarelli B, Pernet B. The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens. Management of Biological Invasions. 2019;10(1):80-95. doi:10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05
    • APA:
      Passarelli, B., & Pernet, B. (2019). The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens. Management of Biological Invasions, 10(1), 80–95. https://doi.org/10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Passarelli, Bruno, and Bruno Pernet. 2019. “The Marine Live Bait Trade as a Pathway for the Introduction of Non-Indigenous Species into California: Patterns of Importation and Thermal Tolerances of Imported Specimens.” Management of Biological Invasions 10 (1): 80–95. doi:10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05.
    • Harvard:
      Passarelli, B. and Pernet, B. (2019) ‘The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens’, Management of Biological Invasions, 10(1), pp. 80–95. doi: 10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Passarelli, B & Pernet, B 2019, ‘The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens’, Management of Biological Invasions, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 80–95, viewed 15 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Passarelli, Bruno, and Bruno Pernet. “The Marine Live Bait Trade as a Pathway for the Introduction of Non-Indigenous Species into California: Patterns of Importation and Thermal Tolerances of Imported Specimens.” Management of Biological Invasions, vol. 10, no. 1, Mar. 2019, pp. 80–95. EBSCOhost, doi:10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Passarelli, Bruno, and Bruno Pernet. “The Marine Live Bait Trade as a Pathway for the Introduction of Non-Indigenous Species into California: Patterns of Importation and Thermal Tolerances of Imported Specimens.” Management of Biological Invasions 10, no. 1 (March 2019): 80–95. doi:10.3391/mbi.2019.10.1.05.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Passarelli B, Pernet B. The marine live bait trade as a pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous species into California: patterns of importation and thermal tolerances of imported specimens. Management of Biological Invasions [Internet]. 2019 Mar [cited 2020 Jul 15];10(1):80–95. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=135883199&custid=s8280428