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Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics.

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      gait
      Joint hypermobility syndrome
      pedobarography
      plantar pressure
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      417930 Professional machinery, equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers
    • Abstract:
      BACKGROUND: In the relevant literature generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) has been shown to alter the kinetic and kinematic patterns of the human movement system. Although GHS affects the general body biomechanics of individuals, the body of knowledge in plantar pressure distribution in GHS is far from sufficient. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome have abnormal plantar pressure distribution during normal gait compared to healthy individuals. METHODS: A total of 37 participants (mean age: 22.16 ± 2.58 years) diagnosed with GHS and 37 aged-matched participants (mean age: 23.35 ± 2.85 years) without GHS were included in the study. Dynamic plantar pressure distribution was obtained as each participant walked in barefoot at a self-selected pace over EMED-m system (Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany). Correlations between hypermobility score (HS) (Beighton score) and plantar pressure variables, and between group differences in peak pressure (PP), pressure-time integral (PTI), average pressure (AP) and maximum force (MxF) were computed for 10 regions under the sole. RESULTS: HS was significantly correlated with peak pressure under the mid-foot (MF) (r = 0.24, p = 0.043), 5 th metatarsal head (MH5) (r = 0.33, p = 0.001), big toe (BT) (r = 0.44, p < 0.001), and second toe (ST) (r = 0.38, p = 0.001). A similar trend was observed for pressure-time integrals under hindfoot (HF) (r = 0.24, p = 0.04), MF (r = 0.30, p = 0.009), MH5 (r = 0.25, p = 0.033), BT (r = 0.37, p = 0.001) and ST (r = 0.34, p = 0.003). The only significant MxF detected was under the ST (r = 0.23, p = 0.048), and AP was determined to be significantly higher as HS increases indicated by APs under MH5 (r = 0.24, p = 0.042), BT (r = 0.32, p = 0.005) and ST (r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Peak pressure values under HF were significantly higher in the hypermobile group (p = 0.023), MH5 (p = 0.001), BT (p < 0.001) and ST (p = 0.003). AP and PTI were also found to be significantly higher in the hypermobile group under MH5 (p = 0.009), BT (p = 0.037), and ST (p = 0.003). MxF was higher only under MF5 (p = 0.029) and SF (p = 0.041) in the hypermobile group. CONCLUSION: The forefoot regions received a higher load in GHS during gait. This could be useful in clinical evaluation of the foot in GHS, preventing potential injuries of lower extremity, and also in processes related to decision making for foot orthotics and/or rehabilitation protocols. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation is the property of IOS Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey
      2Institute of Health Sciences, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey
      3Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bandırma On Yedi Eylül University, Bandırma, Turkey
    • Full Text Word Count:
      4699
    • ISSN:
      1053-8127
    • Accession Number:
      10.3233/BMR-170973
    • Accession Number:
      135355863
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SIMSEK, I. E. et al. Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics. Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, [s. l.], v. 32, n. 2, p. 321–327, 2019. DOI 10.3233/BMR-170973. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=135355863&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 29 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Simsek IE, Elvan A, Selmani M, et al. Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics. Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 2019;32(2):321-327. doi:10.3233/BMR-170973.
    • APA:
      Simsek, I. E., Elvan, A., Selmani, M., Cakiroglu, M. A., Kirmizi, M., Bayraktar, B. A., & Angin, S. (2019). Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics. Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, 32(2), 321–327. https://doi.org/10.3233/BMR-170973
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Simsek, Ibrahim Engin, Ata Elvan, Metin Selmani, Mehmet Alphan Cakiroglu, Muge Kirmizi, Burcin Akcay Bayraktar, and Salih Angin. 2019. “Generalized Hypermobility Syndrome (GHS) Alters Dynamic Plantar Pressure Characteristics.” Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation 32 (2): 321–27. doi:10.3233/BMR-170973.
    • Harvard:
      Simsek, I. E. et al. (2019) ‘Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics’, Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, 32(2), pp. 321–327. doi: 10.3233/BMR-170973.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Simsek, IE, Elvan, A, Selmani, M, Cakiroglu, MA, Kirmizi, M, Bayraktar, BA & Angin, S 2019, ‘Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics’, Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 321–327, viewed 29 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Simsek, Ibrahim Engin, et al. “Generalized Hypermobility Syndrome (GHS) Alters Dynamic Plantar Pressure Characteristics.” Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, vol. 32, no. 2, Mar. 2019, pp. 321–327. EBSCOhost, doi:10.3233/BMR-170973.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Simsek, Ibrahim Engin, Ata Elvan, Metin Selmani, Mehmet Alphan Cakiroglu, Muge Kirmizi, Burcin Akcay Bayraktar, and Salih Angin. “Generalized Hypermobility Syndrome (GHS) Alters Dynamic Plantar Pressure Characteristics.” Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation 32, no. 2 (March 2019): 321–27. doi:10.3233/BMR-170973.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Simsek IE, Elvan A, Selmani M, Cakiroglu MA, Kirmizi M, Bayraktar BA, et al. Generalized hypermobility syndrome (GHS) alters dynamic plantar pressure characteristics. Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation [Internet]. 2019 Mar [cited 2020 May 29];32(2):321–7. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=135355863&custid=s8280428