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Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California.

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  • معلومة اضافية
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Invasive species
      landscape genetics
      predator control
      red fox
      Vulpes fulva
      Vulpes vulpes
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      112930 Fur-Bearing Animal and Rabbit Production
    • Abstract:
      Invasive mammalian carnivores contribute disproportionately to declines in global biodiversity. In California, nonnative red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes) have significantly impacted endangered ground-nesting birds and native canids. These foxes derive primarily from captive-reared animals associated with the fur-farming industry. Over the past five decades, the cumulative area occupied by nonnative red fox increased to cover much of central and southern California. We used a landscape-genetic approach involving mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) sequences and 13 microsatellites of 402 nonnative red foxes removed in predator control programs to investigate source populations, contemporary connectivity, and metapopulation dynamics. Both markers indicated high population structuring consistent with origins from multiple introductions and low subsequent gene flow. Landscape-genetic modeling indicated that population connectivity was especially low among coastal sampling sites surrounded by mountainous wildlands but somewhat higher through topographically flat, urban and agricultural landscapes. The genetic composition of populations tended to be stable for multiple generations, indicating a degree of demographic resilience to predator removal programs. However, in two sites where intensive predator control reduced fox abundance, we observed increases in immigration, suggesting potential for recolonization to counter eradication attempts. These findings, along with continued genetic monitoring, can help guide localized management of foxes by identifying points of introductions and routes of spread and evaluating the relative importance of reproduction and immigration in maintaining populations. More generally, the study illustrates the utility of a landscape-genetic approach for understanding invasion dynamics and metapopulation structure of one of the world's most destructive invasive mammals, the red fox. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Ecology & Evolution (20457758) is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Mammalian Ecology and Conservation Unit, Veterinary Genetics Laboratory, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue/Old, Davis Road, Davis California, 95616‐8744
      2Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis California, 95616
      3Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N, Olympia Washington, 98501‐1091
    • Full Text Word Count:
      11333
    • ISSN:
      2045-7758
    • Accession Number:
      10.1002/ece3.2229
    • Accession Number:
      116870913
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SACKS, B. N.; BRAZEAL, J. L.; LEWIS, J. C. Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California. Ecology & Evolution (20457758), [s. l.], v. 6, n. 14, p. 4775–4791, 2016. DOI 10.1002/ece3.2229. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=116870913&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 25 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Sacks BN, Brazeal JL, Lewis JC. Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California. Ecology & Evolution (20457758). 2016;6(14):4775-4791. doi:10.1002/ece3.2229.
    • APA:
      Sacks, B. N., Brazeal, J. L., & Lewis, J. C. (2016). Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California. Ecology & Evolution (20457758), 6(14), 4775–4791. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2229
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Sacks, Benjamin N., Jennifer L. Brazeal, and Jeffrey C. Lewis. 2016. “Landscape Genetics of the Nonnative Red Fox of California.” Ecology & Evolution (20457758) 6 (14): 4775–91. doi:10.1002/ece3.2229.
    • Harvard:
      Sacks, B. N., Brazeal, J. L. and Lewis, J. C. (2016) ‘Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California’, Ecology & Evolution (20457758), 6(14), pp. 4775–4791. doi: 10.1002/ece3.2229.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Sacks, BN, Brazeal, JL & Lewis, JC 2016, ‘Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California’, Ecology & Evolution (20457758), vol. 6, no. 14, pp. 4775–4791, viewed 25 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Sacks, Benjamin N., et al. “Landscape Genetics of the Nonnative Red Fox of California.” Ecology & Evolution (20457758), vol. 6, no. 14, July 2016, pp. 4775–4791. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1002/ece3.2229.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Sacks, Benjamin N., Jennifer L. Brazeal, and Jeffrey C. Lewis. “Landscape Genetics of the Nonnative Red Fox of California.” Ecology & Evolution (20457758) 6, no. 14 (July 15, 2016): 4775–91. doi:10.1002/ece3.2229.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Sacks BN, Brazeal JL, Lewis JC. Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California. Ecology & Evolution (20457758) [Internet]. 2016 Jul 15 [cited 2020 May 25];6(14):4775–91. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=116870913&custid=s8280428